The Influence of Neck Stiffness on Head Kinematics and Maximum Principal Strain Associated With Youth American Football Collisions

A recent article from the Journal of Applied Biomechanics and on Neck injuries which is a current hot topic.

Authors:

Janie Cournoyer
David Koncan
Michael D. Gilchrist
T. Blaine Hoshizaki

University of Ottawa;
University College Dublin

Published: 08 Mar 2021

The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in head kinematics and maximum principal strain in youth American football helmet-to-helmet collisions between an unbiased neckform and prototype neck apparatus, including springs, representing the upper trapezius, the splenius capitis, and the sternocleidomastoid muscles, for 3 impact velocities, 3 impact locations, and 2 striking masses. This research was part of a larger project funded by the National Operating Committee on Sport Safety Equipment to inform youth helmet testing procedures.

Understanding the relationship between head mass and neck stiffness during direct head impacts is especially concerning in youth sports where athletes have higher proportional head mass to neck strength.

For full study results and conclusions click on the link

The Influence of Neck Stiffness on Head Kinematics and Maximum Principal Strain Associated With Youth American Football Collisions

 

Single leg hop for distance symmetry masks lower limb biomechanics:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2020-103677

Time to discuss Single Leg Hop distance as decision criteria for return to sport after #ACL reconstruction ?

A MUST read paper and not surprised after seeing the authors associated with the work

The study evaluated the lower limb status of athletes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) during the propulsion and landing phases of a single leg hop for distance (SLHD) task after they had been cleared to return to sport.

The Authors wanted to evaluate the biomechanical components of the involved (operated) and uninvolved legs of athletes with ACLR and compare these legs with those of uninjured athletes (controls).

For the full paper click on the link : bjsports-2020-103677.full

 

Anterior cruciate ligament injury: towards a gendered environmental approach

Authors:

  1. Joanne L Parsons
  2. Stephanie E Coen
  3. Sheree Bekke

Anterior cruciate ligament injury: towards a gendered environmental approach | British Journal of Sports Medicine (bmj.com)

For all coaches out there, If you work with female athletes of any level in a coaching, clinical or performance role….. This is a must read.

The paper discusses the curious absence of gender as an influencer in the dialogue surrounding ACL injuries. the study proposes adding gender as a pervasive developmental environment as a new theoretical overlay to an established injury model to illustrate how gender can operate as an extrinsic determinant from the pre-sport, training and competition environments through to ACL injury and the treatment environment.

 

For a full read of the paper click here : bjsports-2020-103173.full

 

Mental health management of elite athletes during COVID-19: a narrative review and recommendations

Reardon CL, et al. Br J Sports Med 2020;0:1–10. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2020-102884

Authors:
Claudia L Reardon, Abhinav Bindra, Cheri Blauwet,
Richard Budgett, Niccolo Campriani,Alan Currie, Vincent Gouttebarge, David McDuff,
Margo Mountjoy, Rosemary Purcell, Margot Putukian, Simon Rice, Brian Hainline

Article Abstract:

ABSTRACT: Elite athletes suffer many mental health symptoms and disorders at rates equivalent to or exceeding those of the general population. COVID-19 has created new strains on elite athletes, thus potentially increasing their vulnerability to mental health symptoms. This manuscript serves as a narrative review of the impact of the pandemic on management of those symptoms in elite athletes and ensuing recommendations to guide that management. It specifically addresses psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and higher levels of care. Within the realm of psychotherapy, crisis counselling might be indicated. Individual, couple/ family and group psychotherapy modalities all may be helpful during the pandemic, with novel content and means of delivery. Regarding pharmacotherapy for mental health symptoms and disorders, some important aspects of management have changed during the pandemic, particularly for certain classes of medication including stimulants, medications for bipolar and psychotic disorders, antidepressants, and medications for substance use disorders. Providers must consider when in-person management (eg, for physical examination, laboratory testing) or higher levels of care (eg, for crisis stabilisation) is necessary, despite potential risk of viral exposure during the pandemic. Management ultimately should continue to follow general principles of quality health care with some flexibility. Finally, the current pandemic provides an important opportunity for research on new methods of providing mental health care for athletes, and consideration for whether these new methods should extend beyond the pandemic.

The study states :

What is already known:

► Elite athletes suffer from many mental health symptoms and disorders at rates equivalent to or exceeding those in the general population.

► The COVID-19 pandemic has created several new stressors for elite athletes.

► Management for athletes during the COVID-19 pandemic has focused on cardiac complications, screening for asymptomatic disease and return to sport, incorporating hygiene measures

What are the new findings:

► The COVID-19 pandemic has created changes in the way in which management of mental health symptoms and disorders in elite athletes—inclusive of community-based or outpatient psychotherapy, outpatient pharmacotherapy and higher levels of care—should be delivered.

► Within the realm of psychotherapy, crisis counselling and other forms of individual psychotherapy, couple/family and group psychotherapy all may be helpful during the COVID-19 pandemic, with novel content and means of delivery.

► Some important aspects of pharmacotherapy for management of mental health symptoms and disorders in elite athletes have changed during the pandemic, particularly for certain classes of medication including stimulants, medications for bipolar and psychotic disorders, antidepressants and medications for substance use disorders.

► It is important for providers to consider when in-person management or higher levels of care for mental health symptoms and disorders are necessary for elite athletes, despite potential risk of viral exposure during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Full Article Click here bjsports-2020-102884.full

Early Strength and Conditioning techniques at the turn of the 20th Century

They had the right idea for punishment or training? You decide

Scapula Fractures in Elite Soccer and Rugby Players

Review of Article

Authors:

Jerome McIntosh,* MBBS, Pouya Akhbari,† MBBS, MSc, FRCS (Tr & Orth) Eng,
Amar Malhas,‡ MBBS, FRCS (Tr & Orth) Eng, and
Lennard Funk,†§ MBBCh, MSc, FRCS (Tr & Orth) Eng

Scapula fractures are infrequent, representing 1% of all fractures. They are often secondary to high-energy trauma and have significant associated injuries. Over 50% of scapula fractures occur as a result of road traffic collisions, with almost 20% involving a pedestrian being struck by a car. A simple fall accounts for only 12% of scapula fractures in the population.

While most of the fractures can be successfully managed nonoperatively and a superior shoulder suspensory mechanism injury, may require surgical intervention. Almost 90% of scapula fractures are attributed to high energy mechanisms. These are well reported in the literature, with associated injuries. Anterior glenoid rim fractures associated with dislocation have also been reported. However, scapula fractures attributed to sports injuries are not well reported in the literature.

Approximately 0.5% of all sports-related fractures are scapula fractures. No studies were identified that focused on scapula fractures in rugby or European football (soccer). Elite rugby players are a unique population in that they are often subjected to high-energy collisions.6 Each player can expect to routinely receive 1.95 to 2.13 times their bodyweight during tackles and collisions, with the mean weight of a front row player approaching 99.79 Kg.

The forces involved become substantial. Predictably, these common events during any match lead to a high rate of injury and time off play. Specifically, shoulder injuries are thought to occur every 17,000 player-hours of a match, although only 1% of those result in a fracture.

Scapula fractures in elite rugby players are rarer, representing only 8% of significant shoulder injuries requiring specialist orthopaedic management. Given its significance, there is little in the literature specifically addressing this injury.

During the 8-year study review period, the senior author saw 829 shoulder injuries in competitive rugby players and 103 shoulder injuries in competitive soccer players. Eleven patients with scapula fractures were identified (Table 1). Of these, 9 patients were professional rugby players (4 rugby league and 5 rugby union); 1 patient was a professional soccer player; and 1 patient was an amateur soccer player.

The results of this study demonstrated that scapula fractures in rugby or soccer players are associated with a prolonged recovery time of 4 to 5 months. There is little in the literature focusing on scapula injuries in professional rugby players other than its incidence.

The rate of suprascapular nerve injury in rugby players was 22% in the study. The literature also reports high rates of ongoing pain after scapula neck and body injuries treated nonoperatively, with rates of exertional weakness approaching 40% to 60% of cases.

To conclude, Scapula fractures acquired in sports are a serious injury with a prolonged recovery period, and they can have career-ending effects. There is a high association of these fracture patterns with suprascapular nerve injuries, which must be examined during clinical assessment. These high-energy injuries are rarely described in athletes and classically relate to major trauma, highlighting the forces associated with rugby and other contact sports.

To read the entire article click on the link : Scapula Fractures

Exercise profile – Video from the Training Ground

Lumbar multifidus activation

The Effects of Myofascial Release With Foam Rolling On Performance

In this paper, 26 subjects performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility).

Fatigue, soreness, and exertion were also measured.

The results were as follows:

  1. There were no significant differences between foam rolling and planking for all 4 of the athletic tests.
  2. Post exercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking.

In conclusion, the reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements. However, foam rolling had no effect on performance.

it’s important to distinguish between training aids that enhance recovery (either perceived or real) vs. those aids that have a specific impact on performance. In this case, let’s not through the baby out with the bathwater – just because foam rolling had no impact on performance, doesn’t mean it serves no purpose at all. If it can boost recovery (even perceived) then the athlete/s may be able to train again in a shorter time frame, and/or with greater quality during subsequent sessions.

Read the article and make your own conclusions :

The Effects of Myofascial Release With Foam

EXPLORING NONOPERATIVE EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

From the American College of Sports Medicine by Sara Lynn Terrell, Ph.D. and James Lynch, M.D. ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal® January/February 2019

FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT BACKGROUND

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is characterized by pathologic contact during hip range of motion (1). The idea of hip impingement, although noted in the 1930s, is becoming an increasingly prevalent concern with today’s athletes and the general population (2,3). The purpose of this review is to describe FAI pathology, explore current treatment approaches, and outline example exercise interventions that may improve quality of life for individuals diagnosed with FAI.

Exploration of nonoperative exercise interventions is warranted. This article offers some examples of how to safely improve postural alignment, core stabilization, gluteal activation, and range of motion in individuals with FAI.

Keep reading the article to reach to the Conclusions: ARTICLE






The Effects of Myofascial Release With Foam Rolling on Performance

Healey, Kellie C.; Hatfield, Disa L.; Blanpied, Peter; More
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 28(1):61-68, January 2014.
This study on Foam Rollers studies it’s efficiency, according to the paper self-myofascial release has become an increasingly common modality to supplement traditional methods of massage, so a masseuse is not necessary.
However, there are limited clinical data demonstrating the efficacy or mechanism of this treatment on athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of myofascial rollers before athletic tests can enhance performance.
The study design was a randomised crossover design in which subject performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility).
Please continue reading for the results and outcomes