Sports Drinks and how to make your own

With lockdown easing and the return of Grassroot sports, it is very important to keep hydrated. sports performance can be affected by dehydration, so it is important to be well hydrated…before, during and after activity.

Drinks can contain various amounts of carbohydrate & electrolytes (salts) that assist with rehydration or energy replacement. Choose a drink depending on whether you need to replace fluids or energy/carbohydrate (or both):

Water – will replace fluid losses but not provide energy – suitable for low intensity or short duration exercise (less than 45 minutes) – for longer activities (more than one hour) add a little sugar & salt to enhance absorption & fluid retention.

Hypotonic drinks – these contain low levels of carbohydrate (less than 3g/100ml) & some salt – they are absorbed into the body more quickly than water – they provide fluid but not much energy use these drinks to replace fluid quickly & when energy is not really required (if training lasts less than one hour & is low intensity).

Isotonic drinks – these contain carbohydrate (4-8g/100ml) – they are absorbed into the body as fast or faster than plain water – they provide fluid & some carbohydrate to fuel the muscles – these are the most effective drinks to use for rehydration during training & competition use these to replace fluids & for some energy (if training for more than one hour) – drink before, during & after exercise.

Hypertonic drinks – these have a higher carbohydrate content (more than 10g/100ml), including pure fruit juice, many canned drinks & energy drinks – they are absorbed more slowly than plain water – they replace lost energy rather than fluids & are therefore not an effective way to rehydrate use these when energy replacement is important (eg: when you are unable to get enough energy from food & need to top up your daily carbohydrate intake),

Stimulant drinks usually have a high carbohydrate content (which does not help with rehydration) & other additives (eg: caffeine, taurine), most of which have no beneficial effect on performance. These drinks should be avoided during sport.

Most people need 1.5-2L of fluid per day plus what is lost during exercise. Fluid includes all drinks, plus fluid in meals (like milk on cereal, or soup). Ideally, start activity fully hydrated by drinking about 500ml water, or suitable sports drink, about 2 hours before activity, plus another 150-350ml in the 10 minutes before starting activity. During activity drink small amounts frequently (150-200ml every 15-20 minutes). After activity, try to replace fluid losses within 2 hours, especially if training more than once a day. Do not wait until you feel thirsty (by then you will already be dehydrated).

Young athletes bodies are less able to cope with the stresses of activity because their bodies are not very efficient when coping with the heat activity generates, & the temperature & humidity of some pools do not help the situation. As a result young athletes are at greater risk of dehydration, as well as being more sensitive to its effects. Young athletes do not realise how much fluid they are losing during activity & they are not very good at replacing fluids voluntarily – therefore they should be reminded to drink during training (every 15-20 minutes). Children should be allowed to drink until their thirst is satisfied, then encouraged to drink some more (because their thirst mechanism is poorly developed). If young athletes are particularly irritable at the end of a training session they should be monitored to assess how much fluid they are habitually drinking. Water is an acceptable drink, but it may be necessary to provide a flavoured drink that is more appealing & provides some energy.

Fluid losses can be monitored by checking body weight before & after activity (1kg lost body weight = 1L fluid lost from the body). Dehydration can be checked by using a pee chart (right).

 

Generally, if training involves less than an hour of activity it is not necessary to refuel during activity. Good food & regular drinks before training will provide adequate energy & hydration for activity, and then good food & drink choices after activity will refuel & rehydrate the body.

Recipes for home-made sports drinks

Try different drinks during training to find one that you like. Drinks might taste different during & after exercise, so don’t decide on a drink when you are not exercising. Choose a drink that best matches your needs (fluid or energy). Salt in drinks enhances absorption & retention of fluid in the body.

 

Hypotonic drink                                   Hypotonic drink

100ml fruit squash                               250ml fruit juice

900ml water                                        750ml water

1/5th teaspoon (1g) salt                        1/5th teaspoon (1g) salt

 

Isotonic drink

50-70g glucose or sugar

1L water or sugar-free squash

1/5th teaspoon (1g) salt

Dissolve the glucose or sugar & salt in 100ml warm water before adding them to the remaining 900ml cold water or sugar-free squash

 

Isotonic drink                                      Isotonic drink

500ml unsweetened fruit juice             150ml high juice squash

500ml water                                        850ml water

1/5th teaspoon (1g) salt                        1/5th teaspoon (1g) salt

 

Hypertonic drink

400ml squash

1L water

1/5th teaspoon (1g) salt

 

References:

Sport Nutrition 3rd Edition 2019 Author: Asker Jeukendrup Michael Gleeson

Food for Sport: Eat Well, Perform Better Griffin, Jane (2001) Food for sport, Crowood Press

https://www.bda.uk.com/ 

www.sportsdietitians.com.au;

Hydration in Amateur Sport

After a year away from the sporting pitches and with the possible return to full training of Semi Professional and Amateur (Grass roots) sports in June, we must never forget the fundamental role that water plays in our body, cooling, nutrient transport, joint lubrication, digestion, and absorption.

Ref: EU Hydration institute.

The Human body is 60 or 70% made up of water, many of it is found in the blood and muscles. The amount of water in the body is limited, if the losses are not replaced there may be a decrease in heat transmission from the muscles to the skin, the consequence of which will be the increase in body temperature, favouring the risk of dehydration, the first signs are intense thirst, dry body, hot, dry skin and mucous membranes, cramps (sodium is lost due to perspiration), depletion by hydro-electrolytic imbalance (which manifests with dizziness, sweat, tachycardia, headache, paleness, etc.), heatstroke (decreased level of consciousness, neuromuscular un-coordination).

Dehydration causes a decrease in aerobic capacity, maximum aerobic potency, muscle endurance and the ability to develop physical work. In addition to the physical qualities mentioned, mental faculties, fine coordination and therefore it is essential to provide fluids during exercise, mainly when large water losses occur. The proper way to hydrate will depend on:

  • The goal to achieve (increase muscle mass, decrease adipose tissue, optimize performance, etc.)
  • The intensity, frequency, duration, etc. of the training to be performed
  • The weather (temperature and humidity)
  • Individual variations (there are people who sweat more than others) Having these factors present should opt for the right drink (water and / or sports drink) and rehydration strategies should be practiced during training. Recommendation: Never try a new strategy on match day, that is what training is for.

HYDRATATION (PARTY/TRAINING)

The goal is to ensure a state of euhydration (i.e. normal hydration) and prevent gastrointestinal discomfort. Avoid diuretic or gas drinks (alcohol, coffee, etc) and Drink between 300-600ml of water (without gas) in the pre-match time (preheating); and more if the temperature and/or humidity are high or if you are a “profuse sweater”.

Normal hydration status is defined the presumed condition of healthy individuals who maintain water balance. Evaluation of hydration status is not easy, as during daily activities or exercise, fluid compartments are constantly fluctuating and therefore the evaluation of a single body fluid compartment volume is insufficient to provide valid information about total body water (TBW) .

HYDRATION DURING (Matches/Training)

Players need to be educated regarding the benefits of fluid replacement to promote performance and safety and the potential risks of both hypohydration and hyperhydration on health and physical performance. Quantify sweat rates for physically active individuals during exercise in various environments. Work with individuals to develop fluid-replacement practices that promote sufficient but not excessive hydration before, during, and after physical activity.

The goal is to replenish sweat-lost water and provide an energy source, to delay glycogenic emptying and therefore fatigue.

With high-performance athletes, restricting dehydration to no more than 2% body mass loss helps to maintain the physiological, perceptual, and safety aspects of their exercise while aiding in exercise recovery and subsequent training sessions.

Dehydration is the process of water loss from the body and being in a dehydrated state means you no longer have sufficient fluid in your body to optimally function. Naturally, even at rest we lose fluid by as much as 1-3L per day.

In any training greater than 60 minutes long and high intensity, Water and/or sports drink, if possible, containing the necessary and sufficient nutrients such as sodium (to promote water absorption) and carbohydrates. The latter delay, but do not prevent, muscle fatigue; since the utilization rate is higher than the ability to eat carbohydrates during exercise.

Always have drinks during a pause in a game such as penalties, conversions, at half-time and, always when the referee allows you to… or between exercise sessions in the gym/field. Pay special attention to those who remain substitutes, they must rehydrate in the substitutes’ bench, to be prepared in case they have to enter the game.

If we are dehydrated our performance will NOT be optimal, with weight loss of 2% there is decreased athletic performance, 3% decrease in physical endurance 4% there is decreased muscle strength, thus having a personal plan and drinking a sufficient amount of fluid could be the difference between winning and losing.

You should not wait to be thirsty to drink liquid; at that moment you are already dehydrated!!

Other reasons for inadequate liquid intakes are lack of availability of liquids, unrespecting liquids, sports tradition, lack of awareness in the subject.

REHYDRATION (PARTY/TRAINING)

The volume of liquid lost depends on the intensity and duration of the activity, the temperature and ambient humidity, the clothing used, the acclimatization of the person to heat, the movement of air and solar radiation. The thirst mechanism is activated when a lot of fluid has already been lost, so it is important to control losses by comparing pre- and post-activity weight and urine color (the more yellow, the greater fluid loss, usually).

Example of how urine colour might vary with Hydration status:

Ref: EU Hydration Institute

The strategy to follow is: drink 1/2 litre of sports drink as soon as you finish training/playing and then you should consume up to 150% of the lost weight, within 2-3 hours. Example: 90Kg player with a dehydration of 2% lost 1.8Kg, the volume to consume would be 2.7 litres (2700ml): 1st half litre and then 2200ml.

As a rule, consume between 500-1000ml/hour of sports drink or mineral water (without gas), larger amounts may be necessary on days of high temperatures.

Although there is no exact answer for how much water you should consume as everyone may have different needs depending on individual and environmental factors, aim for approximately 35ml of fluid per kg body weight. That is just over 2 litres for a 60kg adult, or 2.8 litres for an 80kg adult. Active children should aim for 1-1.5 litres per day (approx. 4-6 glasses) and everyone should consume extra fluid if exercising.

All this is plannable and trainable!! Do not leave hydration released at random. Do not test these strategies for the first time in a match; but try to get used to drinking workouts every 15-20 minutes.

DEHYDRATION is one of the main 5 nutritional factors related to fatigue and decreased performance, along with the emptying of glycogen deposits (energy) in active muscles, decreased blood glucose (hypoglycemia), gastrointestinal discomfort, excess adipose mass (ballast). All is preventable with food education and “training” habits.

It is up to you to be hydrated.

Some ideas

1-2 hours before exercise – suitable foods include:

  • Milk shake or smoothie
  • Breakfast cereal with milk
  • Cereal bars
  • Fruit-flavoured yoghurt
  • Fruit

Less than 1 hour before exercise – suitable foods include:

  • Sports drinks
  • Squash drinks
  • Jelly sweets

References:

Maintaining Euhydration Preserves Cognitive Performance, But Is Not Superior to Hypohydration Stephen P. J. Goodman, Ashleigh T. Moreland & Frank E. Marino Journal of Cognitive Enhancement volume 3, pages338–348(2019)

Eat Well, Feel Well: The Importance Of Hydrationhttps://www.irishrugby.ie/2020/05/12/eat-well-feel-well-the-importance-of-hydration/

National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for the Physically Active J Athl Train. 2017 Sep; 52(9): 877–895.

Key tips on hydration Educational tool-measuring hydration status – European Hydration Institute

Water: http://www.Scienceforsport.com 

 

Nutrients : journal of human nutrition

The Effects of Physical Activity and Diet Interventions on Body Mass Index in Latin American Children and Adolescents:  A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Authors: Andrés Godoy-Cumillaf , Paola Fuentes-Merino, Armando Díaz-González , Judith Jiménez-Díaz , Vicente Martínez-Vizcaíno , Celia Álvarez-Bueno and Iván Cavero-Redondo

I don’t usually read this journal but this study published on the 20th of May addresses physical activity and nutrition and caught my attention. This paper did a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the effect of physical activity only with that of physical activity plus diet interventions on body mass index (BMI) in Latin American children and adolescents.

The Study discusses results on the effect of physical activity plus diet agree with previous meta-analyses that have analysed non-Latin American populations, highlighting that physical activity is one of  the central elements of weight loss. However, when combined with diet intervention, the reduction ranged from 3.2% to 20% more, underscoring that the best results are achieved when calories are restricted. All this confirms the necessity of designing interventions which combine physical activity with a nutritional component. physical activity plus diet programs proved to be more efficient in decreasing BMI values in children and adolescents.

To summarise it is necessary to implement more physical activity plus diet interventions in Latin America, in order to help in reducing the high levels of overweight and obesity that are found in this region.

To read the full Article click on the link : Nutrients

How weight gains have also damaged N.F.L. retirees

In the past few decades, the National Football League’s emphasis on the passing game and quarterback protection has led teams to stock their offensive and defensive lines with ever-larger men, many of them weighing well over 300 pounds (136.7 Kg). But their great girth, which coaches encouraged, and which helped turn some players into multimillion-dollar commodities, leaves many of them prone to obesity problems.

In retirement, these huge men are often unable to lose the weight they needed to do their jobs after leave the professional leagues.

According to the report, many linesmen say they were encouraged by their high school and college coaches to gain weight to win scholarships and to be drafted by the N.F.L., where a lot of players were required to become even bigger. In some cases, players were converted from tight ends to down linemen, and needed extra weight to play the new position. Coaches often leave it up to the players to decide how to gain weight. Which begs the question where’s the scientific evidence to encourage this behaviour where’s are the coaches getting this information?

A study published in December by The American Journal of Medicine found that for every 10 pounds football players gained from high school to college, or from college to the professional level, the risk of heart disease rose 14 percent compared with players whose weight changed little during the same period.

Read the article for it’s conclusions and make your own conclusion: Weight Gain and Health Affliction

For myself my own conclusions are:

Very Ironic the US President feeding the Clemson Tigers football team hamburgers, fries and pizza, and praising the food as “good american food”.

The most common cause of obstructive sleep apnea is excess weight and obesity

Players need to lose weight by diet not just exercise, and by diet, I mean healthy eating.

The NCAA should/must enforce rules that prohibit excessive fat to body weight and reduce hypertrophy that leads to health deterioration. Strength Coaches should work on delivery better programs and not muscle building.

NFL must look at options that bigger doesn’t mean always stronger or healthier.

Top 14 – Finally the end of the pounds

By Jeremy Fadat via Midi Olympique

Interesting S&C and Nutrition Article, Less hypertrophy more Strength and Anaerobic Power. translated from the French, reading between the lines some of this is targeting the stretchshortening cycle (SSC) Article in English  Original Article can be found here