EFFECT OF ACUTE COMPLEX TRAINING ON UPPERBODY FORCE AND POWER IN COLLEGIATE WRESTLERS

In this paper, 13 collegiate male wrestlers with >1 year of strength training were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Chain Bench Press or Plate Bench Press to see which would improve explosive power measured using a Plyometric push up on a force plate more.

The athletes performed a Plyometric push up, Chain/Plate Bench Press set 1 (6 reps @ 60%), 30 seconds rest, Plyometric push up, 3 minutes rest, Chain/ Plate Bench Press set 2 (6 reps @60%), 30 seconds rest, and Plyometric push up.

The authors found that the Chain Bench Press did not result in higher upper-body power over traditional plate loaded resistances.

The study’s concluded, peak force appears to be less affected by fatigue than peak power during a complex training protocol for the upper body. The optimal recovery periods that will minimize the fatigue elicited from the conditioning contraction yet enhances strength and power potentiation for the subsequent ballistic exercise requires further study.

Reading the paper, it seems the rest period between the load set to the Plyometric push up is way too short. Most evidence suggests that post-activation potentiation (PAP) can last up to 5 mins post load set. Secondly, the load appears to be way too light to stimulate PAP.

Read the paper and make your own conclusion:

Effect of Acute Complex Training on Body Force and Power in Collegiate Wrestlers

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research Volume 33 (4) Page 902–909