EFFECT OF STRENGTH ON VELOCITY AND POWER DURING BACK SQUAT EXERCISE IN RESISTANCE- TRAINED MEN AND WOMEN

Published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Authors ANDREW T. ASKOW, 1 JUSTIN J. MERRIGAN, 2,3 JONATHAN M. NEDDO, 2,3 JONATHAN M. OLIVER, 1 JASON D. STONE, 1 ANDREW R. JAGIM, 4 AND MARGARET T. JONES2,3

1 Department of Kinesiology, The Sport Science Center at Texas Christian University, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas 2 Center for Sports Performance, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 3 Division of Health and Human Performance, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 4 Department of Exercise Science, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, Missouri

VOLUME 33 | NUMBER 1 | JANUARY 2019

The authors looked at 2 groups of subjects (male & female) who all had experience with weight training. Body composition testing was performed followed by determination of back squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM). After at least 72 hours of recovery, subjects returned to the laboratory and completed 2 repetitions at each of 7 separate loads (30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% 1RM) in a random order. During each repetition, peak and average velocity and power were measured.

Men produced higher absolute peak and average power and velocity at all loads. When power output was normalized for body mass, significant differences remained. However, when normalizing for strength, no significant differences were observed between sexes. Furthermore, when subjects were subdivided into strong and weak groups, those above the median 1RM produced higher peak power, but only at loads greater than 60% 1RM.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS These data suggest that differences in power production are strongly related to maximal strength, irrespective of sex. Therefore, weaker men and women may benefit more from maximal strength training than stronger men and women, who are likely closer to their maximal strength level. Furthermore, the finding that strength is an important determinant of power production may offer utility for strength and conditioning practitioners. Given that power production is highly associated with athletic success (division of play and starting status), weaker individuals may benefit most from training to increase overall strength to augment power-production capabilities.

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